After the world's attention was diverted to seemingly more important issues, it appeared crucial to let the world know of the human rights violations currently taking place in Syria.
Whether it be through a riffle or a pen, it is every Syrian's duty to fight back, and social media has proven to be a somewhat effective method of doing so. This is my feeble attempt at spreading awareness in a language that will hopefully be understood by the majority.

How was the Syrian Revolution ignited?
Back in 2011, mass protests were held in solidarity with the detained boys of Daraa where the Syrian Army was deployed to quell the uprising and soldiers were ordered to shoot innocent protestors.
After months of arresting, torturing, and killing civilians, the revolution evolved to an armed rebellion.
What is the FSA?
Short for Free Syrian Army, the FSA was first started by commander Riad Al-As'ad around mid-2011. It is composed of civilian volunteers and Syrian Army defectors who thought it necessary to take up arms in order to defend themselves, their families, and their towns from the regime's mercenaries.

Protest in Yarmouk, a besieged refugee camp in Syria, in solidarity with the people of Gaza.

The Palestinian community in Syria has been profoundly and catastrophically affected by the past three years of bloodshed. Nowhere is this more evident than in the Yarmouk refugee camp.

By the start of the 2011 Syrian uprising, the Yarmouk camp housed some 150,000 Palestinian refugees, the largest concentration in Syria.Government forces eventually surrounded the Yarmouk camp and placed it under siege, cutting off humanitarian aid and food deliveries. This siege has led to more than 100 deaths related to dehydration and famine so far. But the siege was not so strict initially—it has been tightened in two stages. The first partial siege was instituted as part of the regime’s initial crackdown on Yarmouk, whereas a much tighter and deadlier siege followed later.

More than 1,740 Palestinians have been killed by the Syrian regime since the beginning of the Syrian revolution. (x)

Zakatul Fitr for Syrian families

sikoot:

Syrian Sunrise Foundation’s programs are Zakat eligible, supporting needy families. Zakatul Fitr is $10/family (due before Eid).

Zakatul Mal can be calculated using an calculator online here: https://syriansunrisefoundation.org/what-we-do/zakat

Please consider donating if you are able and sharing if your are not.

(via freesyria)

Syrian children in Damascus protesting for the children of Gaza, Palestine.

Children of Syria, children of Palestine: We deserve to live" | "Syria, Gaza.. Same country, same wound" -Children of the Qaboun neighborhood: 15/7/2014.

refugeeartproject:

"I hope to go back to Syria to study art & open galleries"


UNHCR recently invited young refugees in Jordan to paint World Refugee Day, June 20 2014, messages on canvas from old tents. Ibtihaj, 12-year-old from Homs who wants to become an artist, tested her skills.

What the Future of Syria Wants | SOURCE

ma-ba3ref:

In Aleppo, Syria — where Syrians are currently living under daily bombardment — a vigil is held to honor the victims in Gaza.

via Shehab News Agency

Kafranbel for Gaza; “يا غزة سامحينا، يلّي فينا مكفّينا”

Kafranbel for Gaza; “يا غزة سامحينا، يلّي فينا مكفّينا”

syrianfreedomls:

July 7, 2014 - Syrian refugees stay hungry in Ramadan

(Source: youtu.be)

"From Homs, greetings to Gaza"

"From Homs, greetings to Gaza"

Kafranbel, on point as always. Both t-shirts read “we love you”.

Kafranbel, on point as always. Both t-shirts read “we love you”.

Syrian women sit in a temporary shelter at the unofficial Dalhamiye refugee camp in Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

Syrian women sit in a temporary shelter at the unofficial Dalhamiye refugee camp in Bekaa Valley, Lebanon

letswakeupworld:

Syrian refugee children make toys out of scrap materials found in a refugee camp at the Turkish border.

letswakeupworld:

Syrian refugee children make toys out of scrap materials found in a refugee camp at the Turkish border.

(Source: teakdoor.com)

yallair7al:

HOW MANY MORE CHILDREN WILL ASSAD ORPHAN? Maaret Al Nouman, (Idleb) : Jun 29, 2014 - She cries for her mother who lay dead before her. Killed by an airstrike by Assad’s forces. Her brother is the only family left to comfort her.

vicemag:

Syrian Children Are Drawing to Heal the Trauma from War 
In an upscale district of Downtown Beirut, two pre-teen boys rapped in Arabic during an exhibit showcasing the artwork of Syrian refugee children. Ramzi, a 12-year-old originally from Daraa, Syria, beatboxed as his friend Ayham, who is also from Daraa, spit rhymes. Guests watched quietly, impressed, as the two boys recalled life before the uprising-turned-civil war wreaked havoc on their country.
This was part of an exhibit, called “Light Against Darkness,” the result of a three month art workshop that focused on helping children overcome the trauma of war through creative expression. Forty-three children produced about 166 works of drawings and clay sculptures, many of which depicted colorful renditions of schools, kids playing together, and families bonding.
Others, however, were not so cheery. Suha Wanous, a young girl originally from Latakia but who arrived to Lebanon from Damascus, the Syrian capital, drew a daughter holding her mother’s hand while a gun is pressed to her head point-blank. In the background of the picture, it’s raining and a helicopter is opening fire on a home while two small children lay on the grass bleeding, presumably dead. The organizers of the exhibit explained how Suha used to pass an army checkpoint daily before going to school back in Syria. She used to greet the soldiers Assalamu Alaykum (meaning “peace be upon you” in Arabic.)
Continue

vicemag:

Syrian Children Are Drawing to Heal the Trauma from War 

In an upscale district of Downtown Beirut, two pre-teen boys rapped in Arabic during an exhibit showcasing the artwork of Syrian refugee children. Ramzi, a 12-year-old originally from Daraa, Syria, beatboxed as his friend Ayham, who is also from Daraa, spit rhymes. Guests watched quietly, impressed, as the two boys recalled life before the uprising-turned-civil war wreaked havoc on their country.

This was part of an exhibit, called “Light Against Darkness,” the result of a three month art workshop that focused on helping children overcome the trauma of war through creative expression. Forty-three children produced about 166 works of drawings and clay sculptures, many of which depicted colorful renditions of schools, kids playing together, and families bonding.

Others, however, were not so cheery. Suha Wanous, a young girl originally from Latakia but who arrived to Lebanon from Damascus, the Syrian capital, drew a daughter holding her mother’s hand while a gun is pressed to her head point-blank. In the background of the picture, it’s raining and a helicopter is opening fire on a home while two small children lay on the grass bleeding, presumably dead. The organizers of the exhibit explained how Suha used to pass an army checkpoint daily before going to school back in Syria. She used to greet the soldiers Assalamu Alaykum (meaning “peace be upon you” in Arabic.)

Continue

The Charcoal Boys.

Anas should be at school with friends. But like a growing number of Syrian refugee children, he is working to survive.

Anas is 12 years old. In other parts of the world, children his age spend their days at school. But Anas is a Syrian refugee, one of over a million who have fled to Lebanon. To help his family of six survive, he now spends his days sorting lumps of charcoal to be sold as fuel. Stuffing them into sacks, he is among a growing number of child refugees who must work to help their families survive in a foreign land.

Although Anas’s parents would prefer that he returned to school, as tens of thousands of Syrian refugee children do, they feel they have little choice. “My dad cannot find work, neither can my mum or sister,” the boy explains. And with rent topping $200 a month and his little sister falling ill, even the $5 a day that Anas earns is essential.

“I miss school,” says Anas, washing up after a dusty day at work. “Playing with friends, chasing each other, hide and seek, karate.”

With millions of Syrian refugees crossing borders to escape the war, child labour is a growing concern. UNHCR and its partners are tackling the problem by counselling parents and employers, providing cash assistance to the neediest families and developing programmes where children can study during their free time.

When children are found to be working excessive hours or at risk of abuse, their cases are given priority by protection workers. “We cannot stop child labour from happening,” says UNHCR Lebanon’s child protection coordinator, Elsa Laurin. “But we can mitigate the impact.”

Anas takes pride in helping to support his family, but he wishes he had other options. “I miss school,” he says, washing up after a dusty day at work. “Playing with friends, chasing each other, hide and seek, karate.”

Like so many Syrian children, young Anas is growing up too fast.