After the world's attention was diverted to seemingly more important issues, it appeared crucial to let the world know of the human rights violations currently taking place in Syria.
Whether it be through a riffle or a pen, it is every Syrian's duty to fight back, and social media has proven to be a somewhat effective method of doing so. This is my feeble attempt at spreading awareness in a language that will hopefully be understood by the majority.

How was the Syrian Revolution ignited?
Back in 2011, mass protests were held in solidarity with the detained boys of Daraa where the Syrian Army was deployed to quell the uprising and soldiers were ordered to shoot innocent protestors.
After months of arresting, torturing, and killing civilians, the revolution evolved to an armed rebellion.
What is the FSA?
Short for Free Syrian Army, the FSA was first started by commander Riad Al-As'ad around mid-2011. It is composed of civilian volunteers and Syrian Army defectors who thought it necessary to take up arms in order to defend themselves, their families, and their towns from the regime's mercenaries.

sikoot:

"Syria expats, we are under bombing everyday, and have not given up hope
Why are you hopeless?” 

-Kafranbel, November 22 2013.

Almost a year ago.

sikoot:

"Syria expats, we are under bombing everyday, and have not given up hope
Why are you hopeless?”

-Kafranbel, November 22 2013.

Almost a year ago.

sikoot:

"They say that if God loves you, He will let you live a long life, but I wish that He loved me a little less. I wish that I didn’t live long enough to see my country in ruins." 
-Ahmad, a 102 year old Syrian refugee. 

photo: UNHCR, A. McConnell

sikoot:

"They say that if God loves you, He will let you live a long life, but I wish that He loved me a little less. I wish that I didn’t live long enough to see my country in ruins."
-Ahmad, a 102 year old Syrian refugee.

photo: UNHCR, A. McConnell

dinzwaz:

Children in Aleppo, Syria swimming in a bomb crater filled with water

This was from a Vice News documentary, I believe its called “Ghosts of Aleppo.” I recommend watching it 100%. Very good. 

(Source: american-radical)

Syrian Kurds on the border between Turkey and Syria just after mortars hit on both sides. SOURCE: Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty.

Syrian Kurds on the border between Turkey and Syria just after mortars hit on both sides. SOURCE: Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty.

Syrians check a damaged house they say was targeted in U.S.-led airstrikes Sept. 23.

A Syrian Revolutionary Speaks Out: Here’s What The World Should Know

At first look, Farouq Al Habib would seem an unlikely revolutionary. He wears thick, round glasses and speaks with a distinguished and professional air. A banker by trade, he is fluent in Arabic, French, and English. He holds a BA in economics, an MA in international business, and a doctorate in business administration. And in 2011, he founded the Homs Revolutionary Council and helped to lead the Syrian Revolution.
Habib doesn’t look like the “Syrian rebels” depicted on TV or in newspapers. He is not dressed in military gear, and there is no gun strapped to his person — but Habib is quick to note that the Syrian Revolution did not begin with guns or war cries. It began peacefully, with protesters marching unarmed through the streets, with Syrians in the wake of the Arab Spring demanding their own democracy.
Thinking back to the beginning — to 2011, when he stood with “hundreds of thousands of Syrian people marching in the streets, peacefully, carrying the flags of the independence of Syria and calling for freedom and democracy” — that, Habib said, “is the Syrian people. That is the real Syrian people.”
Habib was forced to flee to Turkey in 2013 when the Assad regime threatened his life, he said. But he is still active in helping those inside the country. Today, Habib is the coordinator and program manager for the White Helmets, a search-and-rescue unit operating to save civilian lives inside Syria. The more than 1,000 volunteers who make up the White Helmets are trained by the Red Cross, and the Syria Campaign, a nonprofit registered in the U.K., coordinates fundraising efforts for the group.
Habib was in New York City last week to meet with the U.N. and different governmental bodies to ask for more humanitarian intervention in Syria. “No people in history got freedom for free,” he told The Huffington Post in an interview during his visit. “We have to pay a price. It’s very expensive, we know, we realized. We didn’t imagine it would be so expensive. We didn’t imagine that we would face such a brutal regime using all means against its own people. And we couldn’t imagine that in the 21st century, there would be so much ignorance from the international community. It abandoned us.”
He says he stood up in 2011 because he and his comrades felt a duty to change their nation’s destiny. In spite of the revolution’s peaceful beginnings, he was aware of the dangers, but he never could have imagined the costs. Habib spent most of 2011 helping members of the press capture video and images of President Bashar Assad’s brutal crackdown on protesters. He believed that if the rest of the world saw what was happening in Syria, they would have no choice but to intervene.
For assisting western journalists, Habib was targeted by Assad’s security forces. In 2012, he was captured and detained for smuggling a journalist into a protest. “There is no law in Syria against helping journalists,” Habib told HuffPost, but that didn’t stop the security forces from capturing, jailing and torturing him.
He doesn’t like to talk about the time he spent in prison or the time he spent being tortured. His experience pales in comparison to what others suffered alongside him, he said.
Ironically, it was in the regime’s dehumanizing torture tactics that Habib found something uniquely human to hold onto: a name.
It belonged to a man he had never known outside of the jail’s walls, a man whose face he had never seen. Abo Salim was the man held in the cell adjacent to Habib’s.
Every day, the prison security guards would select two prisoners and take them to be tortured. One morning, Salim was selected, but he never returned. Habib later learned from others who were tortured alongside his prison neighbor that Salim had been tortured to death that day. Habib knew only two things about Salim — that he was from Damascus and that he had a wife and five children whom he loved.
"I prayed to God, and I pledged that if I go alive out of prison, I will take his name and I will try to find his family."
Habib was released from prison — he credits this to a corrupt system and the jailers who accepted the bribes paid by his friends on the outside. True to his word, Abo Salim became his moniker during the remainder of his time in Syria, and he still considers it his revolutionary name.
Unfortunately, Habib has yet to locate Salim’s family in Damascus. He’s not sure if they’ve fled, and he doesn’t know if they’re dead or alive, he said. But whether he’s discussing his dreams for a better Syria or his commitment to finding Salim’s family, Habib has no intention of giving up.
"We are committed to our cause," he said. "It is our country, our destiny, and we can’t give up. We don’t have another choice. We feel that — especially, we as Syrian activists who started this revolution in 2011 — feel that we are responsible to continue because in one way or another, we are a part of this war. Even if we didn’t want it, but we are responsible. Those families, those women and children who are living now under shelling every day, who are exposed to barrels of bombs … of course we are not responsible for those barrels, but we are responsible to help them."
After nearly giving his life to show the world what was happening inside of Syria, after watching so many of his friends die to ensure that nobody on the outside could claim ignorance to the atrocities that his people were suffering, this unlikely revolutionary had a message for the world at large:
"I want to tell the international community that we believed in you," he said. "We believe we share the same values as you, we used to watch American movies and dream of freedom like yours. We used to hear from our friends who live in the west about the rights of the citizens, how the state works for the lives of its own citizens, not for a ruling family. And how the army is the army of the people. And we thought that if we fight for the same values that you announce and you pledge for, we thought that you would help us. Because, in the end, if all of us in the world implement the same values of freedom and dignity and equality, that would bring peace for all human beings. But in the end, we were disappointed."
SOURCE

Syrians check a damaged house they say was targeted in U.S.-led airstrikes Sept. 23.

A Syrian Revolutionary Speaks Out: Here’s What The World Should Know

At first look, Farouq Al Habib would seem an unlikely revolutionary. He wears thick, round glasses and speaks with a distinguished and professional air. A banker by trade, he is fluent in Arabic, French, and English. He holds a BA in economics, an MA in international business, and a doctorate in business administration. And in 2011, he founded the Homs Revolutionary Council and helped to lead the Syrian Revolution.

Habib doesn’t look like the “Syrian rebels” depicted on TV or in newspapers. He is not dressed in military gear, and there is no gun strapped to his person — but Habib is quick to note that the Syrian Revolution did not begin with guns or war cries. It began peacefully, with protesters marching unarmed through the streets, with Syrians in the wake of the Arab Spring demanding their own democracy.

Thinking back to the beginning — to 2011, when he stood with “hundreds of thousands of Syrian people marching in the streets, peacefully, carrying the flags of the independence of Syria and calling for freedom and democracy” — that, Habib said, “is the Syrian people. That is the real Syrian people.”

Habib was forced to flee to Turkey in 2013 when the Assad regime threatened his life, he said. But he is still active in helping those inside the country. Today, Habib is the coordinator and program manager for the White Helmets, a search-and-rescue unit operating to save civilian lives inside Syria. The more than 1,000 volunteers who make up the White Helmets are trained by the Red Cross, and the Syria Campaign, a nonprofit registered in the U.K., coordinates fundraising efforts for the group.

Habib was in New York City last week to meet with the U.N. and different governmental bodies to ask for more humanitarian intervention in Syria. “No people in history got freedom for free,” he told The Huffington Post in an interview during his visit. “We have to pay a price. It’s very expensive, we know, we realized. We didn’t imagine it would be so expensive. We didn’t imagine that we would face such a brutal regime using all means against its own people. And we couldn’t imagine that in the 21st century, there would be so much ignorance from the international community. It abandoned us.”

He says he stood up in 2011 because he and his comrades felt a duty to change their nation’s destiny. In spite of the revolution’s peaceful beginnings, he was aware of the dangers, but he never could have imagined the costs. Habib spent most of 2011 helping members of the press capture video and images of President Bashar Assad’s brutal crackdown on protesters. He believed that if the rest of the world saw what was happening in Syria, they would have no choice but to intervene.

For assisting western journalists, Habib was targeted by Assad’s security forces. In 2012, he was captured and detained for smuggling a journalist into a protest. “There is no law in Syria against helping journalists,” Habib told HuffPost, but that didn’t stop the security forces from capturing, jailing and torturing him.

He doesn’t like to talk about the time he spent in prison or the time he spent being tortured. His experience pales in comparison to what others suffered alongside him, he said.

Ironically, it was in the regime’s dehumanizing torture tactics that Habib found something uniquely human to hold onto: a name.

It belonged to a man he had never known outside of the jail’s walls, a man whose face he had never seen. Abo Salim was the man held in the cell adjacent to Habib’s.

Every day, the prison security guards would select two prisoners and take them to be tortured. One morning, Salim was selected, but he never returned. Habib later learned from others who were tortured alongside his prison neighbor that Salim had been tortured to death that day. Habib knew only two things about Salim — that he was from Damascus and that he had a wife and five children whom he loved.

"I prayed to God, and I pledged that if I go alive out of prison, I will take his name and I will try to find his family."

Habib was released from prison — he credits this to a corrupt system and the jailers who accepted the bribes paid by his friends on the outside. True to his word, Abo Salim became his moniker during the remainder of his time in Syria, and he still considers it his revolutionary name.

Unfortunately, Habib has yet to locate Salim’s family in Damascus. He’s not sure if they’ve fled, and he doesn’t know if they’re dead or alive, he said. But whether he’s discussing his dreams for a better Syria or his commitment to finding Salim’s family, Habib has no intention of giving up.

"We are committed to our cause," he said. "It is our country, our destiny, and we can’t give up. We don’t have another choice. We feel that — especially, we as Syrian activists who started this revolution in 2011 — feel that we are responsible to continue because in one way or another, we are a part of this war. Even if we didn’t want it, but we are responsible. Those families, those women and children who are living now under shelling every day, who are exposed to barrels of bombs … of course we are not responsible for those barrels, but we are responsible to help them."

After nearly giving his life to show the world what was happening inside of Syria, after watching so many of his friends die to ensure that nobody on the outside could claim ignorance to the atrocities that his people were suffering, this unlikely revolutionary had a message for the world at large:

"I want to tell the international community that we believed in you," he said. "We believe we share the same values as you, we used to watch American movies and dream of freedom like yours. We used to hear from our friends who live in the west about the rights of the citizens, how the state works for the lives of its own citizens, not for a ruling family. And how the army is the army of the people. And we thought that if we fight for the same values that you announce and you pledge for, we thought that you would help us. Because, in the end, if all of us in the world implement the same values of freedom and dignity and equality, that would bring peace for all human beings. But in the end, we were disappointed."

SOURCE


Alaa Basatneh; This remarkable man feeds the homeless cats of war-torn Syria. While most humans have abandoned Masaken Hanano due to constant shelling by the Assad Regime, one person returns daily to feed more than 150 homeless cats. Alaa, an ambulance driver, said he buys about $4 worth of meat to feed about 150 homeless cats, who roam the area.

Alaa BasatnehThis remarkable man feeds the homeless cats of war-torn Syria. While most humans have abandoned Masaken Hanano due to constant shelling by the Assad Regime, one person returns daily to feed more than 150 homeless cats. Alaa, an ambulance driver, said he buys about $4 worth of meat to feed about 150 homeless cats, who roam the area.

(Source: faithinhumanityr, via sharbalibiya)

refugeeartproject:

Selected images from David Gross Captures Artistic Expressions of Syrian Refugee Children

eing a young Syrian refugee portrayed in the style of a Rembrandt paintingis a visual break from the conflict images we’re used to. For photographer David Gross, that’s the point. He uses a dramatic lighting technique calledchiaroscuro to photograph the Syrian refugees he works with in the hopes that by casting these subjects in a new light, we might also begin to see them that way.”

Part of the Inside-Out Project: see website

sikoot:

A study shows that 41% of Syrian children in refugee camps have attempted suicide. (x)

Update

thepeoplewillnotstaysilent:

Over 18,000 Palestinians in Yarmouk camp, Syria are dying, 10 days without water.

Anti-Syrian sentiment in Lebanon

sikoot:

Lebanese nationalism has historically been exclusionary - as are all nationalisms - and isolationist, in that it accentuates differences between the Lebanese and other Levantines or other Arabs while downplaying shared attributes and characteristics.

According to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), as of September 11, 2014 close to 9.5 million Syrians have been forcedto leave their homes since the uprising began in March of 2011. Of those who were forced to move, 6.5 million are internally displaced; the remaining three million left the country as refugees.

Forty percent of those who left Syria (1.2 million people) headed into neighbouring Lebanon. In Lebanon they were met with endemic racism manifesting itself through chauvinistic rhetoric, discrimination, curfews, evacuation notices, and increasingly frequent racial attacks against their person and their livelihood. The Lebanese laud themselves for their sense of hospitality and exceptional generosity, but these claims are now being tested by what has beendescribedas the ‘worst refugee crisis in recent history’, and Lebanon has been failing miserably.

Great article on the history of the treatment of (Syrian) refugees in Lebanon, written by Mahmoud Mroueh, @MahmoudRamsey on twitter. 

(via sikoot)

littleghostwriter:

Caught In Conflict - Syria’s Unending War

The Syrian Civil War is in its fourth year, with almost two hundred thousand Syrians dead and at least nine million displaced.

The whole world is watching, but everyone is just talking about deep concerns. Start to act. This war has to end. Now.

(Source: reuters.com, via sharbalibiya)

qasaweh:

Our revolution’s united front. FSA and the Kurdish YPG to fight ISIS in northern Aleppo!

(Source: mabiddi)

aliofbabylon:

When will America realize that its support of the Syrian opposition is what strengthened ISIS. How many damn videos of FSA factions pledging allegiance to ISIS over the past several years do you need? Whatever revolution there was in Syria, it was quickly hijacked by ISIS and Jabhat Al-Nusra. There is no longer a revolution in Syria. There’s a proxy war where the Syrian people are the ultimate victims and Iraqis are paying the price due to the spillover of fighters.

As well as being stupid and ignorant, this post is disrespectful to the martyrs who gave their lives for the sake of a better Syria and whose hopes were to rid the country of the injustice and oppression it has suffered for more than four decades.
Also, “revolution”, “proxy war”, and “civil war” are not mutually exclusive terms and you don’t get to tell Syrians that their revolution has supposedly “failed”. No liberation movement in the history of the world has been void of corruption, the Syrian people are not responsible for the actions of ISIS (who are counter-revolutionaries, and have caused as much suffering to them as the Syrian regime).